EWH's BMET Library

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Browsing by Issue Date

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  • Unknown author (VSO, 1995)
    This article describes the principles behind oxygen concentrators, some basic safety routines that should be performed, and how to safely use and maintain an oxygen concentrator.
  • Skeet, Muriel; Fear, David (1995)
    The general principle is that air is processed before it reaches the baby (Figure 43). An electric fan draws room air through a bacterial filter which removes dust and bacteria. The filtered air flows over an electric ...
  • Skeet, Muriel; Fear, David (VSO, 1995)
    Disinfection is recommended for equipment that is not intended for piercing the skin, or touching open wounds. Disinfected equipment may safely be in contact with the intact skin and mucous membranes of the body. Equipment ...
  • Fear, David; Skeet, Muriel (VSO, 1995)
    The boiling water disinfector consists of a metal box with a closely fitting lid; in some cases a gasket is fitted between the box and the lid. The water vapour should pass without obstruction via the lid. Inside, the ...
  • Skeet, Muriel; Fear, David (VSO, 1995)
    There are several types of suction machine. According to the design, different flow rates and different pressures - high, low or dual - can be attained. It is important to read and understand the relevant documentation ...
  • Skeet, Muriel; Fear, David (VSO, 1995)
    A fixed theatre lamp is suspended from the ceiling of an operating theatre or treatment room, directly over the centre of the table. It can be positioned by moving the lamp head and its outreach arm (Figure 38). It has ...
  • Skeet, Muriel; Fear, David (VSO, 1995)
    This article describes how to troubleshoot and test power supplies, sockets, and plugs.
  • Skeet, Muriel; Fear, David (VSO, 1995)
    The breakdown of a piece of equipment is inconvenient to us and can put our patients’ lives at risk. The result is frustration and stress. Sometimes a breakdown is inevitable or a repair is delayed because a spare part ...
  • Skeet, Muriel; Fear, David (VSO, 1995)
    The selected suction cap is placed on the baby’s head when it appears. The screw valve on the vacuum pump is closed and the pump is pumped by hand until a vacuum is created. The level of this is indicated on the vacuum ...
  • Skeet, Muriel; Fear, David (VSO, 1995)
    Bottled oxygen is supplied under pressure in specially designed steel cylinders of varying sizes. British Standard oxygen bottles range in capacity from 170 litres to 6800 litres.
  • Unknown author (WHO, 1995)
    The rugged, high-quality X-ray equipment specified for the W H O Basic Radio­ logical System (BRS) is ideally suited for small clinics, health stations, first-referral hospitals, and general practices under the supervision ...
  • Unknown author (WHO, 1995)
    Flame photometers are used routinely for the measurement of lithium (Li), sodium (Na), and potassium (K) in body fluids. More sophisticated instruments can also measure calcium (Ca). In flame photometry, an aqueous salt ...
  • Unknown author (WHO, 1995)
    If the instrument is not in use for any length of time, remove the batteries to prevent corrosion. Removal of batteries that have corroded can be difficult. If the rheostat assembly can be removed from the handle, soaking ...
  • Unknown author (Welch Allyn, 1995)
  • Unknown author (WHO, 1996)
    This article provides schematics as well as describing th operation of blood pressure machines or sphygmomanometers.
  • Unknown author (WHO, 1996)
    The choice of laboratory equipment must take into account national regulations and the technical premises that determine the requirements for its appropriate use. The more complex an instrument is, the more the user will ...
  • Unknown author (WHO, 1996)
    Stethoscopes require little maintenance apart from replacement of lost, cracked, or broken parts, such as ear-pieces and diaphragms (Fig. 3.3). On the older types, the tubing may perish and need replacing. While it is ...
  • Unknown author (WHO, 1996)
    The usual atmospheric pressure used for calibration is 760 mmHg (100 kPa or 14.7 psi), which is the standard at sea level. Negative pressure is any pressure that is less than atmospheric, or zero, on the pressure gauge. A ...
  • Unknown author (WHO, 1996)
    Refrigeration is the result of the absorption of energy (heat) during the evapora­ tion of a liquid. A refrigerant liquid is circulated through a closed system of pipes, in which on one side (refrigeration chamber) it is ...