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Clinical Laboratory Ovens Use and Principles of Operation

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dc.contributor.author Malkin, Robert
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-01T19:39:18Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-01T19:39:18Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12091/166
dc.description.abstract Ovens in laboratories are used to dry samples and for evaporating, dehydrating or sterilizing. On a limited basis some are used as a dry incubator. In many cases, precise temperature control is required. Clinical ovens may be bench, cabinet, or walk-in size. However, bench top are the most common in the developing world. All ovens will include a heat source, a well insulated container (usually including a door with tight sealing gaskets), and a thermostat/thermometer. More advanced ovens may include timers/alarms, fans to circulate air inside the oven to achieve uniform heating, shelving units or racks, humidity control options, or air filtration. The heating mechanism may be electric, natural gas, propane, oil, radiofrequency or microwave, but the electric heater is the most common in the developing world. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher EWH en_US
dc.subject Oven en_US
dc.subject Laboratory Oven en_US
dc.title Clinical Laboratory Ovens Use and Principles of Operation en_US
dc.type Book chapter en_US


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