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Observation for HTM

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dc.contributor.author Andrea Cassano-Piché, et. al
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-30T20:24:29Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-30T20:24:29Z
dc.date.issued 2015
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12091/384
dc.description.abstract When people with similar training and experience are presented with a particular situation, it is not uncommon to find that they take fairly different approaches to managing the situation. This is not necessarily because one person has a better approach or more information than another, but because there are many factors that influence how people perform their work. In healthcare, we believe people inherently want to do their work safely and effectively, and that when their performance is unsafe or ineffective, there are factors, which they may or may not be aware of, that influence their performance. These factors come from a combination of internal and external sources that can vary over time. Examples of external factors that can impact work include equipment design, the physical layout of a workspace, expected workflow and work practices, organizational policies, team dynamics, and organizational culture. Internal factors, or natural human limitations (Chapter 3), that can affect our work include our ability to remember multiple units of information, or to pay attention to many things that are happening at the same time. People also vary in terms of their skill level and ability to perform certain tasks based on factors like age, level of training, and experience. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher HumanEra @ UHN & IFMBE Clinical Engineering Division en_US
dc.subject HTM en_US
dc.title Observation for HTM en_US
dc.type Book chapter en_US


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