EWH's BMET Library

The Endocrine System

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dc.contributor.author Wikibooks Contributors
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-30T21:56:28Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-30T21:56:28Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12091/413
dc.description.abstract The endocrine system is a control system of ductless glands that secrete chemical messengers called hormones that circulate within the body via the bloodstream to affect distant cells within specific organs. Endocrine glands secrete their products immediately into the blood or interstitial fluid, without storage of the chemical. Hormones act as "messengers," and are carried by the bloodstream to different cells in the body, which interpret these messages and act on them. It seems like a far fetched notion or idea that a small chemical can enter the bloodstream and cause an action at a distant location in the body. Yet this occurs in our bodies everyday of our lives. The ability to maintain homeostasis and respond to stimuli is largely due to hormones secreted within the body. Without hormones, you could not grow, maintain a constant temperature, produce offspring, or perform the basic actions and functions that are essential for life. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Wikibooks en_US
dc.subject Physiology en_US
dc.subject BTA Skills
dc.title The Endocrine System en_US
dc.type Book chapter en_US


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